To be a voyeur….

It can’t only be me that is intrigued by people watching. I do it all the time, on the train, on the street; in galleries I find myself observing reactions to certain artwork just as much as the work itself. How people are when they don’t have their social shield on.  To show a genuine reaction, one has to be alone, in one’s own mind or physically; being alone is key.

At the Whitney Biennial, Michel Auder’s “I Was Looking Back To See If You Were Looking Back At Me To See Me Looking Back At You”, the work doesn’t need an explanation. A 15:12 minute film, compiled with over 30 years of recordings of overlooking into the night and dusk windows of various  neighbors.

I watched as strangers cooked, sang along, wondered, with their lovers, on their own, on the phone, in their homes. Then I started to watch the other spectators. The artwork triggered my own voyeuristic senses as I watched how people entered and left the room.

I watched for more than the 15 minutes. Some people were there longer, 5 minutes, most left before 1 minute. When a the widows were empty, people stopped watching. At the sight of a naked body, more people than would admit stayed. I watched them watching. Then… there were those that quickly left when they realized the neighbors were having sex. On one hand they leave because they are taken back. But mostly, there is a sudden awareness of communal voyeurism. Exposing our curiosity for the lives of others. This reaction was not only for the nude episodes but also for the emotional scenes. Seeing someone sad, angry, lonely, one begins to connect to fundamental human emotions simply by watching.

Michel Auder, Still from Untitled (I Was Looking Back To See If You Were Looking Back At Me To See Me Looking Back At You), 2014. © Michel Auder

Michel Auder Untitled (i was looking back to see if you were looking back at me to see me looking back at you), 2012 video, color, sound 15 minutes

Dinner in Bushwick….

(Burrito de Pollo)

A serious note on living in the art world, writing, and learning. Work with everything you have. Don’t miss your opportunities, if you do, you die. Ask questions, ask about everything. Show that you’re thinking, with concise language draw in spectators. You’re in a circus, selling popcorn in the stands don’t funk up and you’ll get in the ring one day. Think about everything, be everywhere.

On a side note, I’ve never had a burrito on a plate. Drizzled with sour cream and sauce, garnished with tomatoes. The burrito’s savage nature was stripped away or should I say, metaphorically unwrapped so as to only be visually appealing. I couldn’t pick it up, I couldn’t grip it. I ate a burrito with a fork and knife because restaurant yuppie ideals are manipulating Tex-Mex cousine to assimilate and cater to manicured hands.

Form is also color. Without color there is no form. Form and color are one.
D. Judd, “Some Aspects of Color in General and Red and Black in Particular”
What makes art (appealing)(attractive)(alluring)(seductive)(enticing)?
I tend to fall into a binary where work which I am compelled by is either visually and technically intense or it is conceptually heavy and historically tied. I review these criteria daily and I am constantly challenged by my own contradictions, which also allows for flexibility in what I write, how I react, and how I talk about it.
Today there is an uneasy play of bone piercing chilled rain with a confusing sense of “could this be spring?” syndrome. I walked into the Whitney Museum, it’s my first visit and all my senses are triggered. Do I think about the rigid brutalist architecture… cement walls, just as cold and constant as the rain? But then again… the 5th floor walls are lined with a modernist exhibit  American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe and the rest of the museum is invaded by the Whitney Biennial 2014. . #Museumprotip Start from the top down*.
Calder was a pleasant surprised, I hadn’t seen much well know work in a while, it’s refreshing to find myself in a historical context after (and before) the overflow of contemporary.  

Equilibrium amongst fragmented pieces, a balance of metal sheets and organic flowing form. Their colorful presence versus their distant black and white shadows.
Pomegranate, 1949. On a white pedestal 1 by 1 and 4 feet in height, stands in perfect balance a half circle curve of steel rod. It extends beyond to the right the rod curves dows and to the left the rod curves up about 2 feet. At each end there hand a combination of black and red metal sheets shaped in organic leaflets forms. The left arrangement is of eight metal sheets that are roughly 1/2 to 2 feet in size. The top two are black sheets that  curve to the right like the tip of one’s’ nail, then there is a red shape curving to the left just as organically as a leaf. Below that there is a peculiar shape, a silhouette of a tulip of black metal sheet, a bulb with three blooming points. Overall, there is balance in contradiction. The sculpture is perfectly still in the midst of its own kinetic nature. 
More on the Biennial to come, there was a lot to see and if anything, I recommend the second and third floor, the fourth was a bit disappointing… 
* Museums as temples of learning are set up to guide you and educate, from floor one to the top, one physically ascends into their ideas. When working your way down, one is not being taught but is rather learning, dissecting what was supposed to be implored on one to begin with.

What makes art (appealing)(attractive)(alluring)(seductive)(enticing)?

I tend to fall into a binary where work which I am compelled by is either visually and technically intense or it is conceptually heavy and historically tied. I review these criteria daily and I am constantly challenged by my own contradictions, which also allows for flexibility in what I write, how I react, and how I talk about it.

Today there is an uneasy play of bone piercing chilled rain with a confusing sense of “could this be spring?” syndrome. I walked into the Whitney Museum, it’s my first visit and all my senses are triggered. Do I think about the rigid brutalist architecture… cement walls, just as cold and constant as the rain? But then again… the 5th floor walls are lined with a modernist exhibit American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe and the rest of the museum is invaded by the Whitney Biennial 2014. . #Museumprotip Start from the top down*.

Calder was a pleasant surprised, I hadn’t seen much well know work in a while, it’s refreshing to find myself in a historical context after (and before) the overflow of contemporary.  

Equilibrium amongst fragmented pieces, a balance of metal sheets and organic flowing form. Their colorful presence versus their distant black and white shadows.

Pomegranate, 1949. On a white pedestal 1 by 1 and 4 feet in height, stands in perfect balance a half circle curve of steel rod. It extends beyond to the right the rod curves dows and to the left the rod curves up about 2 feet. At each end there hand a combination of black and red metal sheets shaped in organic leaflets forms. The left arrangement is of eight metal sheets that are roughly 1/2 to 2 feet in size. The top two are black sheets that  curve to the right like the tip of one’s’ nail, then there is a red shape curving to the left just as organically as a leaf. Below that there is a peculiar shape, a silhouette of a tulip of black metal sheet, a bulb with three blooming points. Overall, there is balance in contradiction. The sculpture is perfectly still in the midst of its own kinetic nature.

More on the Biennial to come, there was a lot to see and if anything, I recommend the second and third floor, the fourth was a bit disappointing…

* Museums as temples of learning are set up to guide you and educate, from floor one to the top, one physically ascends into their ideas. When working your way down, one is not being taught but is rather learning, dissecting what was supposed to be implored on one to begin with.

Cool figures generally come from working- or middle-class backgrounds. In a secular, democratic society, they argue, cool is a sign of cultural democracy, a status that has to be earned, rather than passed down by an aristocratic elite. Mystery, steely independence, self-possession and confidence also figure into the mix.
Who’s cool? What’s cool? Thank you “social democracy”.
http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/03/20/arts/artsspecial/in-washington-100-examples-of-the-epitome-of-cool.html?from=arts

Because… have you heard my rants on Mondrian? - Armory Show 2014-

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 Bill Jacobson, Place, 28x22 inches Archival digital pigment print 

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Nelson Leirner

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Marc Bijl, Nite Flights (after Piet Mondrian’s Victory Boogie Woogie) 2014 Epoxy, household paint 150x150 cm

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 Marc Bijl, Abstract Activism (After Piet Mondrian), 2013 Epoxy and silver paintbombs on canvas 100x100 cm

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  Charles Avery, Untitled (Boogie Woogie) 2012, card paper bronze, acrylic 80x20x40 cm

Because art history… duh - Armory Show 2014-

Need I say more? Name the original works… go!

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Chris Jordan, Gyre (after Hokusai), 2009 (2.4. million pieces of plastic) Archival digital pigment print 

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Red Grooms, Northern Lights (Edward Munch), 2013 watercolor, acrylic and ink on magazine, 20x40x10 inches

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Mike & Doug Starn, Double Renmbrandt, Gelatin silver prints, tones, ortho film, wood, adhesive, and plexiglass

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Miguel Angel Rojas

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 Laurent Grasso, Studies into the Past, oil on wood panel 

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 Laurent Grasso, Studies into the Past, oil on wood panel 

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Chris Jordan, Caps Seurat, 2011 60x90 inches archival digital print, 400,000 plastic bottles

Manolo Valdes, Perfil XII,  2013 Collage 64x46 inches

Because purple is my favorite color - Armory Show 2014 Review -

This last week was Armory Week. In the art world this is the starter course to the Spring and Summer season for upcoming openings, museum shows, fairs, fairs, fairs. I made it through only five of the innumerable fairs around the city and now I will recap with several posts. We’ll start easy… favorite colors, historical references, design, conceptual and ars gratia artis. Breath.

Robert Mosse, It Was A Pleasure Then, 2014 Digital C-Print 110x140 Inches 

Vik Muniz, Colonies: LIver cell pattern 1, 2014 Digital C-Print 180x180cm

Chris Martin, Joshua Tree, 2012-2013 Oil and glitter on canvas 223.5x195.6cm

Stephan Balkenhol, Man in pink shirt, 2012 Poplar wood painted 289x65x5 cm 

Frank Stella, Untitled, 1959 Oil & enamel on unstretched canvas 16x12 inches

Carlos Cruz-Diez, Physichromie 1819, 2013 Chromograph on PVC 100x100 cm

Gerhard Richter, Abdallah, 2010 Enamel behind glass 18x16cm

Raymond Jonson, City Forces, 1932 Oil on canvas, 37x68 inches

Emil Bisttram, Pulsation, 1938, Oil on canvas, 60x45 inches

Julian Martin, Untitled, 2012 Pastel on paper, 14x11 inches

Lynda Benglis, Aquanot #27, 1980 Tempera and charcoal on cast paper 49x35x6 inches

Thornton Dial, Master of Space, 2004 Neckties, rope, carpet, artificial flowers, soil, tin, oil, enamel, spray paint 84x108 inches

Tom Wesselmann, Night Time Still Life with Blond and Goldfish, 1999 Oil on canvas 20x25 inches

Juan Usle, Sueno de Salomon, 1, 2008 Acrylic on canvas on wood 

Michael Craig-Martin, Objects of our time, 2014 screenprints

Tsuyoshi Maekawa, Oil on canvas, 1963 163x132 cm

Donald Judd, 1992-1993 Woodcut, 23x30inches

Dan Walsh, Folio B, 2010 Intaglio print 12x12 Inches

Anoka Faruqee, 2013P-74 Circle, 2013 Acrylic on linen, 45x45 inch

Jin Feng, Socialist Leaders: from Marx to Mao, Oil Painting 2013

James Krone, Ceremonial Painting, oil on canvas 2013

Jose Davila, Untitled Cowboy Ravine, 2013 Archival Pigment Print

Xu Zhen, Under Heaver-2802CF3312, Oil on canvas, aluminium, 2013 60x80x11xm 2013

Xu Qu, Route Orange & Purple, Acrylic on canvas 158x150cm 2013

HC Berg, Visual Vortex Dissonance, 2013 Acrylic plastic

 AAron Young

Jason Martin, Breijinho, 2012 Pure pigment on aluminium 

Shinique Smith, When Shadows Fall, 2014 Acrylic, ink, fabric, and collage on canvas, 84x60x3 inches

Airan Kang #armoryshow14 (at The Armory Show)

Hola! My name is Eva Mayha, flower child and tea drinker since birth. Exploring NYC, lurking in museums, rocking out in the art world.

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